Tuesday, 24 March 2020

Ham Radio-Xiegu G90 HF Amateur Radio Transceiver 20W SSB/CW/AM/FM SDR Structure with Built-in Auto Antenna Tuner

Ham Radio-Xiegu G90 HF Amateur Radio Transceiver 20W SSB/CW/AM/FM SDR Structure with Built-in Auto Antenna Tuner.

Ham Radio-Xiegu G90 HF Amateur Radio Transceiver 20W SSB/CW/AM/FM SDR Structure with Built-in Auto Antenna Tuner.

XIEGU G90 Transceiver for QRP Ham Bands.


Are you looking for a QRP with lots of features, read below.

Ham Radio-Xiegu G90 HF Amateur Radio Transceiver 20W SSB/CW/AM/FM SDR Structure with Built-in Auto Antenna Tuner. The Display

The Xiegu display is amazing


Ham Radio-Xiegu G90 HF Amateur Radio Transceiver 20W SSB/CW/AM/FM SDR Structure with Built-in Auto Antenna Tuner.  Ham Radio especially QRP operation is enormously satisfying when you think how far your signal can travel with low power and a decent aerial-I had the opportunity to test out the Xiegu a few days ago and I am impressed at the list of features, including, the transceiver is built on a down-converting SDR(Software-defined receiver), SDR is well established now and the concept is probably known by many radio hams. It uses a 24-bit 48 kHz sampling A to D converter, analog to digital. 

A limited bandwidth signal is mixed down directly to the baseband, this is where the signal is process happens, in actual fact, the G90 is a direct conversion transceiver-i wonder how many radio hams reading this page will remember the happy hours spent building direct conversion receivers-50 years ago when I started with ham radio-I build many.

The Xiegu G90 transceiver covers 160 meters-top band through to ten, 28 MHZ, it also comes equipped with a general coverage receiver, 500 kHz to 30 MHZ.

TX power is adjustable from 1 watt to around 20 watts

Operating modes include SSB, CW,(Morse) and Amplitude modulation-it will also do FT-8 and other Digi modes using your PC.

Functions include split frequency, SWR bridge built in an auto tuner, RX preamp + attenuator, digital noise blanker, a CW decoder, a variable pass-band audio filter.

Built-in CW keyer, and speech processor used for the single-sideband operation below 7 MHz.

The 1.8 Thin film transistor LCD screen displays everything during operation, I was amazed to find a 48KHZ wide spectrum display too, and to top it all the speaker mounted on top sounded very good.
 My thoughts were-this transceiver would be well suited for the new radio ham or experienced operator-the rig is well laid out.

The G90 has plenty of interfacing sockets-it reminded me of an IC-706 transceiver made by ICOM.
The detachable front panel can be remotely mounted using the supplied lead-DB9 cable.

All controls on this little gem are easy to get to-a bouns on such a small TXRX.

The transceiver needs an external PSU-10.5-16.5 volts@8 am maximum current, although 5A seemed to be adequate for maximum power output.

You could use LiPo lithium polymer batteries-they are cheaper for portable operation. I understand from the information gleaned from the web that the G90 will be happy up to 17 Volts DC.

The Xiegu Ham Radio transceiver comes with a fused lead and 10A fuse. Many Radio Hams fit the Anderson power plug to their transceivers.

A 3.5mm-to-USB is included for software updates. I didn't get to do any software update of the transceiver, apparently, you have two updates one for the main unit the other for the front panel. Updating is tedious needing numerous steps-however it does not look difficult.

Xiegu has been active in fixing bugs and feature updates-web search informs me that they have been very responsive to such issues. I would look for a user manual on-line-because of the attention to features and updates the supplied manual is surely going to be out of date quickly.

A user group is here    Great for tips and answers on the G90


When I first operated the transceiver I thought the display was absolutely amazing, it is small but easy to read-there is a lot of information too.

I found the Xiegu G90 a good little transceiver ideal for the QRP and portable operator, the 20 watts of power made quite a difference from my homebrew 5 watts transceiver-SSB penetrated better with the 20 watts. Because its heart is software there will be no doubt that more features will be added. A small stand would have been a good addition, however, when it comes to ingenuity Radio Hams are the masters.

Thank you for reading, 73 de John G4YDM











Ham Radio-Help Brian identify this 1970s era interval signal

Ham Radio-Help Brian identify this 1970s era interval signal

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Brian (W9IND), who writes:
Ham Radio-Help Brian identify this 1970s era interval signal

[Mystery solved! Click here to read the update.] 
Ham Radio-Help Brian identify this 1970s era interval signal.   I want to thank you for stirring a memory that I never thought I’d relive – even though it still doesn’t solve the mystery of what the heck I was listening to in the first place!
Back in the early 1970s, I was a teenage SWLer with a curiosity for the worldwide signals that emanated from the speaker of my shortwave radio. Bitten by the SWLing bug after stumbling across Radio Nederland’s Bonaire relay station, I spent many a happy hour twirling the dial in search of fresh game to hear and QSL.
But on one such occasion (I’m going to guess it was in 1971), I was surprised and fascinated by what sounded like a snake-charming horn playing notes at random. Stranger still, the transmission would seemingly go off the air for a couple of seconds and then return to play the strange melody again. I chalked it up to one of the countless beeps, hums and other electronic noises that often appeared on utility frequencies in those days.
I never recorded it, I never had a clu

Ham Radio-Help Brian identify this 1970s era interval signal













Ham Radio-Yet another mystery utility signal to solve--!

                             Ham Radio-Yet another mystery utility signal to solve--!



Ham Radio-Yet another mystery utility signal to solve--!




Back by popular demand!

Ham Radio-Yet another mystery utility signal to solve--!. On our quest to solve UNID utility signals, SWLing Post contributor David Crawford, is asking for help again to ID yet another interval signal. David writes:
Here’s yet another memorable utili-tune from the deep archives here, again not my recording, origin uncertain.
This one has a date, time and frequency on the filename [19670811-2347-15910-VM unID] and therefore would have been 1967. I heard this one myself occasionally also, which would have been sometime during the mid-to-late 1970s. It would have overlapped with the same time period during which CTNE was using the 14985 kHz tune previously provided, so despite the broad similarity I would assume it wasn’t them. Unless of course they used different tunes for different circuits:

Ham Radio-Yet another mystery utility signal to solve--!